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if he had anything. he led a terrific team. then asa. >> thank you, jim. for all societies behaved differently under stress. at those times, they may even take action that conflicts with their its central character and values. that is what we did here. we were under stress. we took actions that conflict with who we are. who we are called to be and who we have committed to be. then we spent about 10 years not being willing to face the truth about it. often by covering what happened with euphemisms and an awful lot of secrets. i believe our detainee task force is revealing where we strayed from our values by shining the light of investigation and analysis on the problem, in the hope the next time we are under that stress, we do not go down the day -- the same road. has been an honor to serve on this panel. >> thank you. >> just in terms of new things, everyone here discussed the general contents of the report, the most important thing. there are some new points raised in the reports discussion on the role of the international red cross, and the debate inside the organization. we had
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
gifford has an op ed this morning. jim is a republican. what you think about what the senate did? we havehere in delaware plenty of gun laws. sure that is the case in a lot places in the country where somebody gets arrested with a gun crime, usually they are able to eliminate that. they do not prosecute for illegal guns. there are plenty of guns laws already. it is just a matter of having the prosecutors have in the nerve to enforce these laws. this is just another attempt by the federal government to disarm the people of the united states and it is not going to make any favorites. lot of this is a distraction from the economy and the fact they refuse to do anything to cut back on the sides of the government. host: are you a gun owner? caller: i do not own a gun but pretty much everyone else i know owns a gun. -- here ins castle new castle, a lot of people did not have guns. guns start leaking out towards this area. people are very open a round here about gun under ship. about gun ownership. are there any further regulations you would support on gun buying? isler: no, i just think it
was then the news hour and now is the news hour with jim lair all the way. when you listen to the program you're going to get both sides. so we completely identify with the approach of u.s.a. today. but we live today i think all of us recognize in a much more partisan bitter maybe too strong a word but i think it fits in many ways. and some people say well it goes back to the election of 2000 and it's the war in iraq but i think it's more than that. i've seen it -- i was at cnn for 12 years, and you see it as you say in the e-mails you get from people. some people just are never are just not going to be happy. the thing that's reassuring to me though is that you get 150 e-mails from people saying you were tilting too far one way and you tilted too far the other way. and you want to be down the middle and you're going to get that kind of reaction. my question is though does it -- you know, we need to have a healthy debate about these issues but do you want people to be at each other's throats? and i think that's some of what's going on right now. and i think that's something we ought to contin
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there are more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those. we hope you will take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it is important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history durling the time to -- during the time to world war ii that we intered some japanese americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. in the right of history, it was an error. so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in some of the post 9/11 environment. there are key questions we want to answer this morning. one, did the treatment rise to torture? secondly, how did it happen? what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found u.s. personnel in many instances used ininterrogation techniques on detainees that constitutional torture. military personnel conducted cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment. both c
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
, called it pure am necessary tifment jim sharp, a talk show host in phoenix promised that arizonans are still not taking this sitting down. on denny schaffer's show in new orleans, callsers demanded deportations. quote, i see nothing wrong with putting them on a bus and shipping them back to wherever they came from. a caller named alan told mr. schaffer, the law's the law. the senators filed their 844-page bill after 2:00 a.m. on wednesday. officially beginning what president obama and other supporters hope will be six-week effort to pass it in the senate by early june. hearings on the legislation, which tightens border security and offers an eventual path to citizenship, are set to begin on friday. that's from the "washington times." jacksonville, north carolina. arlene, good morning. democrat. caller: good morning. the gun background check situation. tammy baldwin was just on and she said something very interesting, she said, we already have background checks. so what's wrong with going a little bit more? and that's the problem. the problem is, you can't have a little bit. ce you
people on the books, find out who they are. the issueur calls on of boy scouts of america we welcome jim to the conversation from oklahoma. good morning. the gay crowd wants to push how they live on uni. they should be able to decide their own rules and the government should be completely out of it. just like the gay marriage thing. if they want to get married, fine. if a certain church doesn't want to marry them, then so be it. the government should stay out of the whole issue. that's it. host: part of the debate this week on what to do with the alleged bomber involved in the killing of three bostonians over this past week. the headline, republicans want the boston bombing suspect treated as an enemy combatants, sparking miranda debate. key republicans are calling on the obama administration to declare the 19-year-old suspect an enemy combatant subject to the loss of four, so intelligence officials can continue to interrogate him for as long as they deem necessary. authorities captured him in watertown, mass. friday evening. they are invoking the public .afety exception he remains hospi
a jim demint exit at exit security system as well as economic conditions is a good thing. a variety of economic legislation in this are good on balance. >> i want america to win. >> me too. craig huey about how the u.s. is not using immigration policy effectively and as many other countries are to improve economic growth. what countries did you see as doing a good job? numbers, look at the it's in my written testimony, under core visas are for economic reasons at the moment. given the paramount need for economic growth, that cuts across our ability to deal with all our policy challenges, those will all be easier with faster economic growth. focusing on that makes more sense. other countries, we have charts in the written testimony, have a high percentage. other countries that have made reforms recently like the united kingdom looking to do this. if you look at the countries that are struggling right now and likely to fail, dejapan. europe, the exception is germany, which has undertaken a particular percentage of turkish labor. we have to recognize economic reality and adjust our pol
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10